30 Things to Do When Your Craft Business is Slow

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Late February and March tend to be slower months for at home craft business owners. There’s no need to panic, because all businesses experience ups and downs. In fact, slow times can be beneficial because you can get a few extra tasks done. Today, I’m sharing some ideas of things you can do to keep yourself busy during slower business periods.

30 Things to Do When Business is Slow

  1. Take a break. Everyone needs a break sometime. If your business is usually busy and it gets slow – roll with it and take some time off. And, don’t feel guilty about it – not even for a single second.
  2. Clean your craft room/office. There, I said it. You know it needs to be done – so go do it.
  3. Declutter your online existence. After you tackle the craft room, dive into a digital declutter. I’ve got tips for you in this post and this post.
  4. Make something for yourself. So many times when I talk to Silhouette and Cricut small business owners, they can’t remember the last thing that they made for themselves. In many cases, you bought the machine to create stuff for yourself. Go back to your roots and make a few things for yourself!
  5. Make gifts for the year. If you aren’t into making things for yourself, make a list of all the gifts you’ll need for the rest of the year and make them. You’ll thank yourself when birthdays, anniversaries, and Christmas roll around!
  6. Stock your inventory full of ready to ship products. When you get busy again you’ll be ahead of the game. Or, use the products you make at an upcoming craft show or fair.
  7. Schedule your social media. Save time later by scheduling engaging content on social media ahead of time. At the same time, if there is a network that you aren’t familiar with, get to studying and using it. A content calendar can greatly help you.
  8. Catch up on your accounting. If you are one to let your accounting slip through the cracks from time to time, a slow period is the perfect time to catch up. While you are working on accounting, a quick audit can tell you what you can cut out to save money.
  9. Narrow in on your niche. Your niche is your thing. Spend some time focusing in on yours. Not convinced a niche is the way to go? Read my thoughts here.
  10. Audit your business for trademark violations. While is isn’t fun, trademarks are a big deal. Remove any products that are trademarked to another company that you are using without permission. Need help? Head to this section of the blog.
  11. Work on your pricing. Prices shouldn’t be static. Instead, they should be ever changing. In slow periods, lower your prices. Read more about dynamic pricing in this post.
  12. Rebrand your business. If you aren’t happy with your branding, change it. This designer has gotten great feedback for logos by other Cutting for Business readers. Don’t forget to read about colors and small businesses in this post.
  13. Retake your product photos. In many craft businesses, there’s always room for improved photos. Hey, improved photos might even end your slow period. Need photography tips? I’ve got them here.
  14. Freshen up your paperwork. If you include paperwork like instructions with your products, freshen them up to fit with your branding. I’ve got some you can use at this link.
  15. Research and work on SEO. Time spent working on search engine optimization is never time wasted. Those titles, tags, and descriptions are powerful – so use them correctly.
  16. Experiment with new products. If you currently work with vinyl, try working with paper. If you only work with jewelry making, pick up some vinyl. Maybe sublimation is right for you?
  17. Create new designs and products. Expanding your current line of products is a great way to spend your down time.
  18. Network with other makers. There’s thousands of other makers and small business owners that you can connect with on social media. Find a couple that have products who complement yours and reach out to them.
  19. Volunteer or network with a charity. In addition to helping the charity, it’s a good way to get your business name out there.
  20. Start a website/Update your website. If you don’t already have one, a slow time is a great time to start one. Here’s some resources on Cutting for Business.
  21. Work on building your email list. I’ve said it several times on the blog before, but email lists are often your best bet for reaching customers. Read more in this post and this one.
  22. Create a library of email templates. If you regularly email similar information to customers, build a small library of emails to use. Then, when you need one it is just a quick copy and paste and you are done.
  23. Film some videos. Video marketing is here to stay. Put together a video or two to use in your craft business. I’ve got some resources for video marketing here.
  24. Enroll in a class, register for a conference, or attend a tradeshow. Your class could be business related or it can be for pleasure. A few of my favorite online class providers are Udemy, Skillshare, and CreativeLive. For conferences and shows, here is a list of reasons why I recommend them.
  25. Create a passive income stream. Head to this series on the blog and learn more.
  26. Get to know your customers better. Take a look at your analytics and see what patterns you can learn about your customers and the demographic you attract. Create a loyalty program or survey your customers. I’ve got an easy to implement loyalty program here and information about surveying in this post and this one.
  27. Start selling on a new platform. If you don’t use Etsy; try it. Haven’t checked out TpT; head here.
  28. Start shipping internationally. If you only ship to the USA, you’ve got the world waiting for your products. Get some tips in this post.
  29. Find new wholesale suppliers. Searching for new suppliers can be tedious, but if your business is slow – it’s a great time. Here are some of my favorites.
  30. Make your business official. Let’s face it, paperwork is time consuming. Government paperwork is even worse. Use your down time to get it all sorted out. Confused about whether you have a business or a hobby? Here’s what the IRS says.

While your business is slow, you definitely won’t be!

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4 thoughts on “30 Things to Do When Your Craft Business is Slow”

  1. I run a service based business but these tips are super helpful regardless of the business you’re in. Thanks for sharing! I would add to cultivate relationships with current or past clients. I’m Facebook friends with one of my clients. I noticed her granddaughter was in town (who also loved Chuck E Cheese.) I sent over a Chuck E Cheese gift card to her email. She’s been a long-time recurring customer and it was a pleasure to send a small thank you for her business 🙂

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