A Recommended Path for Starting a Home Craft Business

Affiliate Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Additionally, I may get commissions for purchases made through other affiliate links in this post.

Yesterday, I shared my thoughts about starting a business immediately after getting a Silhouette or Cricut machine. If you didn’t get a chance to read that yet, read it here, but know that I recommend you wait at least 6 months.

Wondering what path I do recommend you taking as a new seller? Here it is:

A Recommend Path for Starting a Home Craft Business

  1. Get to know your machine. Get your machine out everyday and experiment with it. Create as many different projects as you can. Find out what you enjoy making as you discover your niche. During this discovery time, you’ll also learn what to do when your machine isn’t quite working correctly.
  2. Start gifting your craft projects to your friends and family. After you’ve redecorated your house twice with your creations, made your kids 32 shirts each, and hosted five parties with handmade decor – it’s time to start giving your crafts as gifts. Gift to your most honest, brutal family members who will give you their unbiased opinions about your work. Now is a good time to learn how to take constructive criticism, too. Trust me on this: Not all customer feedback will be positive.
  3. Sell to your family and friends. Start getting to word out to your family and friends that you will take orders and make products for them. And, it won’t be free. Read this post to find out why you should charge your family and friends full price.
  4. Sell to strangers. If you are still enjoying making and selling products, get yourself out there and start selling to strangers. I recommend using apps like Craigslist, Nextdoor, Mercari, Instagram, and Facebook groups to start. It’s also a good time to focus in on your niche and pick a good business name.
  5. Start an Etsy shop. I think Etsy is a great place to start your handmade business because there’s plenty of customers. You’ll be able to get the hang of regular orders and dealing with customers. You’ll be tied to deadlines and you’ll have an opportunity to work on your photography skills and branding. Want free listings on Etsy? Click here.
  6. Move to your own website. As you master your craft and become an expert in your niche, it’s time to save yourself some fees and move to your own website. I really recommend you keep both your own website and your Etsy shop; since Etsy can help push traffic to your own site. I prefer a WordPress based setup, but services like Wix work well, too.

I’ve put together this plan based on years in the handmade world as a seller, then as a blogger who works with craft business owners on a daily basis. Think you’re ready to get started? Ask yourself these questions.

Was this information helpful? Save the image below to Pinterest.

A Recommended Path for Starting a Home Craft Business with your Silhouette Portrait or Cameo and Cricut Explore or Maker - by cuttingforbusiness.com

4 thoughts on “A Recommended Path for Starting a Home Craft Business”

  1. I d like to see something more specific. Most people get start small and move up. I think things that stop us from starting a business is the business side. Setting up software for book keeping. Everyone sells sell on facebook, how? I never see the how. I think since Etsy is a selling business it would be easy to set up accounts but how about setting up shipping?

    1. Craft shows are hit or miss. Sometimes you’ll do great, sometimes you won’t sell anything. I don’t include them on the recommended path for this reason. I do feel you should attend some and see if you like doing them and if your products sell well in a craft fair setting.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *